empathic

counseling & psychotherapy

Heal. Grow. Thrive.

empathic

counseling and psychotherapy

At the core of happiness is the ability to feel comfortable in your own skin. By the time you’ve gotten to this website, you’ve probably experienced a fair amount of self-doubt and self-criticism. Having low self-esteem can make you feel like you’re unworthy, incapable and incompetent. It can affect your relationships, your work, your mood-nearly every aspect of your life. Sound Familiar?

Lindsay Melka, LPC Counseling Denver CO


Hi, I’m Lindsay. I’m a psychotherapist, but you may also call me a self-esteem igniter, failed-relationship investigator, expert problem-solver or a specialist in connection.

 

Negative self-talk can get in the way of you leading the happy and fulfilling life you deserve. Find a way to stop beating yourself up and release yourself from self-doubt. This can help you realize your full potential.  Together, we can explore what it means to accept yourself more freely and deeply, while working towards building healthier relationships and feeling better about yourself so you can live a more satisfying and enjoyable life. 


I know from my own personal journey, and from helping men and women across the country, that with some courage (you made it here) and help from a therapist, anyone can feel what it’s like to feel truly connected and accepted.


I believe learning to let yourself off the hook and having a good sense of humor can change the world. If you’re struggling with figuring out relationships, yes, even that one with yourself, then schedule a free consultation today.


Hi, I’m Lindsay. I’m a psychotherapist, but you may also call me a self-esteem igniter, failed-relationship investigator, expert problem-solver or a specialist in connection.

 

Negative self-talk can get in the way of you leading the happy and fulfilling life you deserve. Find a way to stop beating yourself up and release yourself from self-doubt. This can help you realize your full potential. Together, we can explore what it means to accept yourself more freely and deeply, while working towards building healthier relationships and feeling better about yourself so you can live a more satisfying and enjoyable life. 


I know from my own personal journey, and from helping men and women across the country, that with some courage (you made it here) and help from a therapist, anyone can feel what it’s like to feel truly connected and accepted.


I believe learning to let yourself off the hook and having a good sense of humor can change the world. If you’re struggling with figuring out relationships, yes, even that one with yourself, then schedule a free consultation today.

Lindsay Melka, LPC Counseling Denver CO

Recent Blog Posts

Recent Blog Posts

October 20, 2016
Lindsay Melka

Is it Depression?

Many people wonder if they’re really depressed. Often times they think their mood is attributed to “just life stuff”. You know, work-stress, marital difficulties, a few too many beers.  It can be difficult to recognize when it’s more than that. People may be scared of the diagnosis, the meaning behind the word depression, the implications. Depression is actually quite common, and with the right help, very treatable. There are different levels of depression. One may think they have to be incapacitated, suicidal or totally hopeless to really be depressed. This is not the case. There are several indicators of depression and whether you experience three or ten symptoms, it really doesn’t matter.  Long story short, if you feel sad, you can get help and you can get better.

Symptoms of Depression

So…Are you depressed? The symptoms of depression may surprise you…or not.  Symptoms of depression tend to look like this:

 

Feelings of hopelessness

Feelings of guilt, worthlessness or shame

Irritability

No longer enjoying what you used to

No longer interested in social engagement

Difficulty concentrating, remembering details, making decisions

Persistent aches or pains, headaches or stomach aches

Loss of appetite or overeating

Loss of sex drive

Insomnia or sleeping too much

Persistent sad or angry feelings

Thoughts of suicide

 

Recognizing the symptoms of depression is often the biggest step you can take towards recovery. Is it Depression, Lindsay Melka LPC, Denver COSomething doesn’t feel right and you know it, but you aren’t quite sure what to do about it.  Dealing with depression can be difficult and participating in counseling can help. You don’t have to be a total mess to seek out a therapist! Therapy can help you identify what’s happening in the present moment, preventing you from feeling worse down the road. Maybe it is just some family discord, your tyrant of a boss or some serious boredom. Whatever the concern, talking to a professional certainly can’t hurt.

 

What happens in therapy?

 

In a nutshell, counseling can help you identify destructive thoughts that get you down and help you understand where those thoughts come from-thus teaching you how to cope.

Therapy for depression often involves examining how the interaction among thoughts, feelings and behavior impacts your well being, then helps change the interaction to produce greater life satisfaction. On a much bigger and philosophical scale-you can begin to develop a new relationship with pain and suffering and reach beyond your pain, finding a larger sense of purpose.  The therapeutic process can help you learn how to create self -compassion and mindfulness skills to help get you through the tough stuff. On a less clinical note, it can feel really good to just talk to someone. Someone who is not your friend or family member. You may be surprised what comes out-in a good way. It can feel like a ton of bricks off your chest. It can also feel really painful. That happens too. Great thing is, once is out there, out in the open, in can be processed, healed. “A problem aired is a problem shared”. Old saying for the importance of sharing yourself and your problems. Side note- it’s helpful to remember some of the catchy sayings because they tend to hold some truth. Really.

If you’re experiencing symptoms of depression, sadness or overall discontent, it may be in your best interest to talk to someone about it. I cannot stress how normal these feelings are. You are not alone. There is nothing wrong with wanting to feel better, regardless of what’s going on.

Lindsay Melka LPC Empathic Counseling and Therapy Denver

Lindsay Melka, LPC

Empathic Counseling and Therapy


If you connected with this post and would like to speak with me please call 720-295-5490 or contact me here.

 

 

October 13, 2016
Lindsay Melka

Men Thrive in Therapy

Asking for Help

Men seek help less. It’s true. But- this is changing. The stigma is diminishing and men are coming to Men thrive in Therapy, Lindsay Melka Denver COcounseling more than ever before. Why is this? Do they see the benefit? Are they hearing about it from other men? Is their spouse asking them to come?

It’s not like its inherent or biologically determined that men seek help less. It’s learned. Men learn that they should be able to do it on their own. They learn to be tough, stoic and strong. So what does it mean if they ask for help? Are they not tough, stoic or strong? No. That’s not what that means. Asking for help is a sign of strength.

Seeking guidance from a therapist is a courageous step for a man to take. It’s admitting that they are struggling with something that feels beyond their control. Admitting this is the first step in what could potentially be, very powerful change.

How does therapy help?

When men share shameful, embarrassing, or unpleasant thoughts with a nonjudgmental, empathic therapist, they can feel relieved, normal and sane. They may realize, for the first time, that what they are thinking and feeling is actually very normal for many men. This alone can empower men to share emotions that may have bottled up for months, even years. When men start to release the weight of negative thoughts and feelings, they can begin to see what’s been happening inside for all this time. They are better able to see patterns, self-talk and resentments that are no longer serving them.

How do men thrive?

Through therapeutic work, men can learn to look inward, self-reflect and gain new awareness of their thoughts and feelings. When you can take a step back, observe yourself and get objective perspectives, you can facilitate change in your life.

When men learn that gaining emotional control directly contributes to regaining control in their personal and professional lives, change happens. Learning to regulate one’s emotions can contribute to success in all areas of a man’s life.

Case Example:

A man comes in to therapy with an anger problem. His problem with anger is causing marital distress, irritability, depression and conflict at work. He is drinking more and the drinking almost always contributes to anger outbursts. He lists the many reasons why he is so angry and shares that “if that person” or “that situation” were to change or be different, he would be “okay”. Throughout the course of therapy he begins to learn that he has little to no control over people, places and things. He learns that anger is a secondary emotion and that there is something happening deep below the surface. He discovers that he feels inadequate, scared and hopeless. His career is unfulfilling and he feels he is letting his family down. He’s struggled with depression for many years and has drank to avoid the feelings that come along with this. Soon, over the course of counseling, he discovers that he can actually manage his emotions. He can learn healthy coping skills and begin to notice triggers and thought patterns that contributed to his struggle with anger. He develops new insight around his behaviors and makes conscious decisions to change them.  He sees small improvement, reinforcing the new behaviors and begins to live a more fulfilling, valued life. This is just one example how transformative therapeutic work can be.

How do you know if it’s time for some counseling?

Listen to your gut. Does something feel off? Maybe you’re tired of dealing with unpleasant thoughts and feelings. Maybe someone suggested it. There is no harm in checking it out and seeing if counseling could be beneficial for you. Life does not have to be completely out of whack for one to get some guidance, feedback and support. Who knows, you might actually enjoy it!

Lindsay Melka LPC Empathic Counseling and Therapy Denver

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lindsay Melka, LPC

Empathic Counseling and Therapy


If you connected with this post and would like to speak with me please call 720-295-5490 or contact me here.